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Woodgraining

Sources of parts, and other hints to get your restration projects on the road.
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Tony Haycock
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Aug 17, 2005 10:30 pm
Location: Christchurch

Woodgraining

Post by Tony Haycock » Wed Aug 17, 2005 10:32 pm

Has anyone out there tried to do their own woodgraining?

Any hints on how do do it appreciated

Tony

Bob Ballantyne
Site Admin
Posts: 81
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2005 6:50 pm
Location: North Shore City, Auckland

Woodgraining

Post by Bob Ballantyne » Mon Aug 22, 2005 7:55 pm

Hi Tony, Bob here. We have an add on woodgraining on steel in the Beaded Wheels however I have done some myself starting off with undercoating the steel dash and window frames then painting over with a dark brown walnut or dark mahogany base coat colour. When dry apply a turps based stain either with a brush or mutton cloth to apply in a pattern resembling the grain of wood. I have seen in some old woodgraining kits a foam roller similar to an ink roller which would give you a stipled effect similar to the grain on some woods also a feather would pattern out the stain to give another wood like effect. All of this is easily removed with turps to wash the whole lot off if you are not happy with what you have ended up with. However if you are happy with your efforts coat over with clear dulon to give you the finished look.All of this advice is coming from a wood finisher french polisher 45 years in the trade. So your first attempt will be similar to my first day of my apprentiship.(1960) Good luck, hope your efforts look like wood. Bob.

Tony Haycock
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Aug 17, 2005 10:30 pm
Location: Christchurch

Post by Tony Haycock » Tue Aug 30, 2005 4:27 pm

Hi Bob

Thanks for that. Will give it a go.


Regards

Tony

Geoff,

woodgraining.

Post by Geoff, » Fri Nov 25, 2005 8:18 pm

Tony, I have done several dash panels now and they are relatively easy to do, but you have to practice a bit first. I paint a base coat of flat ochre or light brown acrylic paint. Wait 24 hours for it to thoroughly dry, then paint over with Cabots acrylic stain, either Rich cedar or walnut, a good thick coat, and wait until it just starts to go tacky. then stipple your pattern with a 2" paint brush, creating a wave or grain or swilr patter, whichever you desire. It is essential that you don't do it too early otherwise the grain just runs back together, and if you leave it too late it goes lumpy, so timing is everything - you have about 10 minutes. When the stain has hardened off, you lightly wet-sand the ridges off, and coat over with a clear polyuerathane to give a nice gloss finish. Good luck,
Geoff.

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